Pupil Premium Strategy Statement (2021/22 -2023/24)

This statement details Hambleton Primary Academy use of Pupil Premium and Recovery Premium funding to help improve the attainment of our disadvantaged children. It outlines our pupil premium strategy, how we intend to spend the funding in this academic year and the effect that last year’s spending of pupil premium had within our school.

School overview

Detail

Data

School name

Hambleton Primary Academy

Number of pupils in school

220

Proportion (%) of pupil premium eligible pupils

27 (12%)

Academic year/years that our current pupil premium strategy plan covers (3-year plans are recommended)

2021/2022

Date this statement was published

December 2021

Date on which it will be reviewed

July 2022

Statement authorised by

Holly Wood, Headteacher

Pupil premium lead

Charlotte Blundell, PP Lead

Governor / Trustee lead

All governors

 

Funding overview

Detail

Amount

Pupil premium funding allocation this academic year

£9,388.75 per quarter

£37,555

Recovery premium funding allocation this academic year

£883.75 per quarter

£3535.00

£649.69 (NTP) per quarter £2,598.76

 

Pupil premium funding carried forward from previous years (enter £0 if not applicable)

£0

Total budget for this academic year

 

£41,090.00 (indicative)

 

 

Part A: Pupil premium strategy plan

Statement of intent

At Hambleton Primary Academy our curriculum intent states, we have the highest expectations of pupil attainment, teacher performance and parental involvement. We encourage everyone to strive for excellence, to achieve potential, irrespective of their background or the challenges they face. The focus of our pupil premium strategy is to support disadvantaged children to achieve that goal, including progress for those who are already high attainers.

At Hambleton Primary Academy we consider and address the challenges faced by vulnerable pupils, such as those who are on Pupil Premium (PP), Looked after Children (CLA) and those identified as requiring Early Help (EH). The activities outlined in this statement intend to support their needs, regardless of whether they are disadvantaged or not.

High-quality teaching is at the heart of our curriculum intent. This is proven to have the greatest impact on closing the disadvantage attainment gap and at the same time will benefit the non-disadvantaged children in our academy. Implicit in the intended outcomes detailed below, is the intention that non-disadvantaged pupils’ attainment will be sustained and improved alongside progress for their disadvantaged peers.

Our strategy is also integral to wider school plans for education recovery, notably in its targeted support through the National Tutoring Programme. At Hambleton NTP has been focused on Year 5 and 6 children. These children have been identified as needing intense support to ensure they are high school ready and attaining at the same level as pre pandemic Year 5 and 6 children.

Our approach will be responsive to common challenges and individual needs, rooted in robust diagnostic assessment, not assumptions about the impact of disadvantage. The approaches we have adopted complement each other to help children excel. To ensure they are effective we will:

  • Ensure disadvantage children are challenged to strive for excellence in order to achieve their potential (Hambleton curriculum intent)
  • Ensure high quality interventions are implemented when a need is identified
  • Adopt a whole school approach in which all staff take responsibility for disadvantaged pupils’ outcomes and raise expectations of what they can achieve

Challenges

This details the key challenges to achievement that we have identified among our disadvantaged pupils.

Challenge number

Detail of challenge

1

Assessments, observations, and discussions with children indicate our year 5 and 6 children are not high school ready and attainment is below that of previous year 5 and year 6 children.

2

Assessments including Well Comms, observations, and discussions with children, parents and teachers have identified children whose language development is below age expected levels. These are evident from Reception through to KS2 and in general, are more prevalent among our disadvantaged children than their peers.

3

Assessments, observations, and discussions with children, teachers and parents have identified gaps in Reading and Writing for individual children including those who are disadvantaged.

External research indicates that gaps in learning for 2019/2020 were most prevalent for disadvantaged children

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/news/eef-publishes-new-research-on-the-impact-of-covid-19-partial-school-closures

Our data 2020-2021 confirms a gap between PP and non-PP in reading and writing.

4

Assessments, observations, and discussions with children, teachers and parents have identified gaps in Mathematical knowledge for individual children including those who are disadvantaged.

External research indicates that gap in learning for 2019/2020 were most prevalent for disadvantaged children

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/news/eef-publishes-new-research-on-the-impact-of-covid-19-partial-school-closures

Our data 2021 confirms a gap between PP and non-PP in maths.

5

On Entry observations identify an issue for many of our children is a lack of resilience and high anxiety levels. These challenges particularly affect vulnerable children including disadvantaged children.

Internal observations and assessments at Hambleton Academy have evidenced that providing children with wider opportunities enhances children’s self-esteem, confidence and participation in lessons increasing their social and emotional skills.

There is extensive evidence associating childhood social and emotional skills with improved outcomes at school and in later life (e.g. improved academic performance, attitudes, behaviour and relationships with peers)

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/social-and-emotional-learning

6

Internal data and observations confirm that our disadvantaged children are not always able to access costed academy wider opportunities, such as resources to enable participation in our academy offer for example the 1:1 ICT device scheme.

There is significant external data that confirms children that are disadvantaged have reduced cultural capital opportunities which can impact negatively on children social and emotional skills.

There is extensive evidence associating childhood social and emotional skills with improved outcomes at school and in later life (e.g Improved academic performance, attitudes, behaviour and relationships with peers)

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/social-and-emotional-learning

Intended outcomes

This explains the outcomes we are aiming for by the end of our current strategy plan, and how we will measure whether they have been achieved.

Intended outcome

Success criteria

Our disadvantaged Year 6 children will be high school ready and meeting at least age expected outcomes at the end of this key stage.

Success criteria 2021/22

Successful transition to high school in September 2022

Key Stage 2 results 75 % of disadvantaged children meet at least expected standards

Success criteria (following 3-year plan)

KS2 results - 88% of disadvantaged children meet at least expected standards

3-year trend - 100% successfully transitioning to high school

Improved standards in speech and language among disadvantaged children

Well-Comm assessments and observations evidence at least good progress towards age expected standards for all identified children.

Improved progress in reading and writing attainment among disadvantaged children

Success criteria 2021/22

Year group assessments and observations will confirm the majority of disadvantaged children meet at least the expected standards for reading and writing

Success criteria (following 3-year plan)

KS2 reading and writing results - 88% of disadvantaged children meet at least expected standards

 

Improved progress in maths attainment among disadvantaged children

Success criteria 2021/22

Year group assessments and observations confirm the majority of disadvantaged children meet at least the expected standards for maths

Success criteria (following 3-year plan)

KS2 maths results - 88% of disadvantaged children meet at least expected standards

Achieve and sustain improved levels of resilience and reduced anxiety levels leading to increased social and emotional skills, particularly for our disadvantaged children

Levels of resilience are observed to increase for disadvantaged children.

Levels of anxiety are observed to reduce year on year from 2021/22 to 2023/24 for disadvantaged children.

Demonstrated by:

  • Observations of the children
  • Pupil voice
  • Teacher and parent observations and discussions
  • Successful transition into next Key Stage from EYFS to KS1, KS1 to KS2 and KS2 to high school. 

Sustained involvement in costed wider academy opportunities, particularly for our disadvantaged children leading to increased social and emotional skills.

100% of disadvantaged children access a range of wider academy opportunities, over a 3-year period.

 

Activity in this academic year

This details how we intend to spend our pupil premium (and recovery premium funding) this academic year to address the challenges listed above.

Teaching (for example, CPD, recruitment and retention)

Budgeted cost: £ 24,000

Activity

Evidence that supports this approach

Challenge number(s) addressed

Training for 1:1 tutor as part of NTP programme

EEF research identifies as the size of a class gets smaller it is suggested that the range of approaches a teacher can employ and the amount of attention each child will receive will increase improving outcomes for children.

We have analysed our year 5 and 6 children and identified they are not high school ready, and attainment is below that of previous 5 and 6 children therefore having an additional adult to support the children in the year groups will increase the ratio of adult to child support.

1

Training for staff to ensure interventions and strategies are in place eg training in Word Aware, Colourful Semantics

Oral language interventions can have a positive impact on pupils’ language skills. Approaches that focus on speaking, listening and a combination of the two show positive impacts on attainment:

Orallanguageinterventions|EEF(educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk)

2, 3, 5

Whole school provision for social and emotional learning will be enhanced by releasing staff to access training - Supporting the Social and Emotional Needs of Children.

There is extensive evidence associating childhood social and emotional skills with improved outcomes at school and in later life (e.g. improved academic performance, attitudes, behaviour and relationships with peers)

 

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/social-and-emotional-learning

 

5, 2

 

Targeted academic support (for example, tutoring, one-to-one support structured interventions)

Budgeted cost: £21,090

Activity

Evidence that supports this approach

Challenge Number(s) Addressed

Provide school-led tutoring (NTP) for Year 5 and 6 children, including disadvantaged children.

Tuition targeted at specific needs and knowledge gaps can be an effective method to support low attaining children or those falling behind, both one-to-one:

Onetoonetuition|EEF(educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk)

And in small groups:

Smallgrouptuition|ToolkitStrand|EducationEndowmentFoundation|EEF

1

‘Communicate  Intervention’ led by Speech and language therapist and assistant 1 day per week. Interventions across the week led by TAs focus on Reception and KS1 and those in KS2 with significant need.

 

Oral language interventions can have a positive impact on pupils’ language skills. Approaches that focus on speaking, listening and a combination of the two show positive impacts on attainment:

Orallanguageinterventions|EEF(educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk)

 

 

2, 5

1:1 and small group interventions for identified needs in reading and writing

Tuition targeted at specific needs and knowledge gaps in reading and writing can be an effective method to support low attaining children or those falling behind, both one-to-one and in small groups

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/teaching-assistant-interventions

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/reading-comprehension-strategies

Teacher will identify gaps in learning for individuals and explain to TAs how to teach a small group or 1:1 to address specific needs and knowledge gaps in reading and writing. IDL spelling and reading programmes will form part of these interventions.

2, 1, 4, 5

1:1 or small group interventions for identified needs in mathematics.

Tuition targeted at specific needs and knowledge gaps in mathematical knowledge can be an effective method to support low attaining children or those falling behind, both one-to-one and in small groups

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/teaching-assistant-interventions

Teacher will identify gaps in learning for individuals and explain to TAs how to teach a small group or 1:1 to address specific needs and knowledge gaps in maths.

 

 

1, 4, 5

 

Wider strategies (for example, related to attendance, behaviour, wellbeing)

Budgeted cost: £18,000

Activity

Evidence that supports this approach

Challenge number(s) addressed

Embed social and emotional learning across the curriculum and Provide Trinity counselling service for identified children

There is extensive evidence associating childhood social and emotional skills with improved outcomes at school and in later life (e.g. improved academic performance, attitudes, behaviour and relationships with peers)

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/social-and-emotional-learning

Teachers will provide social and emotional learning opportunities across the curriculum. Children requiring additional support will receive counselling from our school counsellor (bought in from Trinity). P/P champion will meet all P/P children termly for wellbeing check-up.

5, 2, 6

Provide money / resources for wider academy opportunities, particularly for our disadvantaged children leading to increased social and emotional skills.

There is extensive evidence associating childhood social and emotional skills with improved outcomes at school and in later life (e.g. Improved academic performance, attitudes, behaviour and relationships with peers)

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/social-and-emotional-learning

Internal observations and assessments at Hambleton Academy have evidenced that providing children with wider opportunities enhances children’s self-esteem, confidence and participation in lessons enabling the children to increase their social and emotional skills.

Examples of how the money will be used include purchasing 1:1 I pads paying to ensure children can participate in extra-curricular activities, including provision of kit and fees.

 

6, 5

 

Total budgeted cost: £ 2,000 + £21,090+ £18,000 = £41,090

Part B: Review of outcomes in the previous academic year

Pupil premium strategy outcomes

This details the impact that our pupil premium activity had on children in the 2020 to 2021 academic year, the end of our previous strategy.

Our whole school internal assessments data for core subjects for 2020/21 demonstrated:

  • 64% of Pupil Premium children were working at expected or above with 8% working at greater depth in Reading.
  • 68% of Pupil Premium children were working at expected or above with 8% working at greater depth in Writing.
  • 60% of Pupil Premium children were working at expected or above with 8% working at greater depth in Spag
  • 63% of Pupil Premium children were working at expected or above with 8% working at greater depth in Maths.
  • External Well Comm assessment data demonstrates a positive impact on children’s age-appropriate language development.

These figures are above national average for Pupil Premium children. However, there is gap in outcomes for all core subject areas between Pupil Premium and non-Pupil Premium. The gap between Pupil Premium and non-Pupil Premium from 2019/2020 to 2020/2021 has reduced. This is a result of are most vulnerable children attending school during the second lockdown and our very successful remote learning offer and subsequent adaptation of the curriculum to address gaps. These strategies mitigated some of the disruption caused by Covid. 100% of Pupil Premium children, who were not attending school, engaged in our successful remote learning offer which reflected the curriculum offer provided to children attending school. A full curriculum offer was provided for all children in school and children learning from home, including disadvantaged children.

Our assessments and observations including a Quality Assurance external audit by Mark Williams SIP (April 2021) confirmed that pupil behaviour including those of disadvantaged children continued to be judged as outstanding. For the vast majority of children, including disadvantaged children, high levels of pastoral support meant children’s well-being and mental health were supported to return to pre covid levels. For those children who required additional pastoral support to support their wellbeing and mental health, during the academic year 2020/21, a counselling service was provided. The service included blocks of 1:1 counselling for identified children including disadvantaged children and drop-in sessions for any children experiencing poor wellbeing and mental health.

Externally provided programmes

Please include the names of any non-DfE programmes that you purchased in the previous academic year. This will help the Department for Education identify which ones are popular in England

Programme

Provider

IDL

Ascentis

Counselling service

Trinity Hospice

Communicate Intervention

Local Speech Therapists

 

Further information

Additional activity

Our pupil premium strategy will be supplemented by additional activity that is not being funded by pupil premium or recovery premium. That will include:

  • utilising a DfE grant to train a senior mental health lead. We have trained two members of staff to support our children wellbeing and mental health and allocate time for this important work.
  • Planning a curriculum that develops the following drivers: reliance and teamwork, diversity, community and environment.

 

Planning, implementation, and evaluation

  • In planning our new pupil premium strategy, we evaluated why our disadvantaged children may not succeed as well as their peers and what could be done to address these challenges.
  • We triangulated evidence from multiple sources of data internal and external

 including EEF evidence.

  • We have put a robust evaluation framework in place for the duration of our three-year approach and will adjust our plan over time to secure better outcomes for our children

 

 

Hambleton Primary Academy Pupil Premium Expenditure 2020/2021

What is Pupil Premium?

Pupil Premium Grant is available as funding for two reasons :

  • raising the attainment of disadvantaged pupils and closing the gap with their peers
  • supporting children and young people with parents in the regular armed forces

For the period 2020 to 2021 financial year, pupil premium funding is:
£1,320 for each eligible primary-aged pupil (FSM ever6)
£1,900 for Looked-after children (LAC)

Children who are entitled to pupil premium face challenges such as poor language and communication skills, lack of confidence and issues with attendance and punctuality. The pupil premium is intended to directly benefit the children who are eligible, helping to narrow the gap between them and their classmates.

Metric

Data

 School name

Hambleton Primary Academy

Pupils in school

226

Proportion of disadvantaged pupils

27 ( 11.9%)

Pupil premium allocation this academic year

£7,707.50 per quarter (+ LAC virtual schools)

Academic year or years covered by statement

2020/2021

Publish date

September 2020

Review date

July 2021

Statement authorised by

Holly Wood

Pupil premium lead

Charlotte Blundell

Governor lead

Lisa Knowles

 

Category

Expenditure

Purpose

Cost

Speech and Language Difficulties

‘Communicate’
consultancy to include children assessment, 1:1 and group sessions, training for key new staff and monthly review of assessment

 

 

Use of Communicate ongoing intervention for consistency 1 day per week (Therapist and assistant) to improve communication and language skills across school generally but with main focus on Reception and KS1 and those in KS2 with significant need.

 

To provide early intervention for pupils in EYFS with SLC needs

 

Committed time of staff through school managing and delivering S&L therapy

Speech Language

Therapist – Communicate

Therapist £142 (3.5 hours) – 39 weeks

SL Assistant £40 (1 hour) – 39 weeks Total: £5800

 

 

 

 

TA delivery time

15 mins x 5 days a week = 75 mins

75 mins x 5 classes = 375 mins (6.25 hours)

6.25 x £10 x 40 weeks = £2,500

Anxiety, Low self Esteem, Resilience

Learning Mentor Time (including target work). Member of staff to check in with all PP children half termly on a 1:1 basis. Offering intervention for children as and when needed

Trinity Counselling and Link Service

Provide support and guidance to help our children who are experiencing difficulties in learning due to social, emotional or behavioural problems. Our Learning Mentor helps our children overcome behavioural, social or emotional problems that are affecting their learning. One to one support and interventions put in place if needed

We seek to develop understanding of resilience across the whole school community and to establish systems to build ‘resilience approaches’ that support disadvantaged children over time, through a whole school approach. This can be on 1:1 basis/ family sessions. Also provide training and support for members of staff at Hambleton.

2 days x 5 hours @ £10 = £100

£100 x 40 weeks = £4,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total: £2500

Staff Time

Extra TA Booster time (in class)

 

 

 

IDL (Spelling Programme)

IDL yearly Subscription

 

 

 

 

SENCo/Pupil Premium Champion time

 

Experienced TA’s within school delivering high quality intervention or additional boostering. Accessible to pupils of all abilities (additional needs, closing the gap, as well as achieving greater depth)

 

Ideally for children with dyslexia, this programme helps ALL children make progress in spelling skills. Also improves reading and typing skills.

5 days x 3 hours @£10 = £150

£300 x 40 weeks = £6,000

 

 

 

£200 for subscription

TA time to run the programme-

15 mins x 5 days a week = 75 mins

75 mins x 5 classes = 375 mins (6.25 hours)

6.25 x £10 x 40 weeks = £2,500

Total = £3,000

Child Specific and Enrichment

Providing children with equipment to enhance their learning and ensuring all children have access to remote learning. Ipads/tutoring/equipment

As well as continuing to provide free membership of extra-curricular clubs, we will provide additional clubs to improve and develop language and social skills to equip children with the skills that they need to be successful in life. Music helps develop a child in many different areas.

All children have their own ipad to assist learning in school and remote learning when necessary.

Total: £3500

 

 

 

Total 30,000

Pupil Premium Expenditure 2019/2020

Number of pupils and pupil premium grant (PPG) for the academic year 2019/2020

Total number of pupils on roll 227
Total number eligible for PPG 28
Amount for the academic year 2019/2020 £35,200
Pupil Premium Champion Mrs Charlotte Blundell
Next Pupil Premium Strategy Reviews 28/11/19, 26/02/20, 08/05/20, 10/07/20
What are our key strategies to close the attainment and progress gaps for FSM and Pupil Premium Pupils at Hambleton
  • A rich, exciting and engaging curriculum offer for all.
  • Developing Resilience
  • Quality Teaching throughout school

Current Standards Throughout School (Whole School)

  Reading Writing SPaG Maths
Expected Standard 81.1 79.6 80.9 85.7
PP/Non-PP 52.9/83.8 47.1/82.7 53.3/83.7 70.6/87.2
Above Expected Standard 37.2 26 31.5 34.7
PP/Non-PP 5.9/40.2 5.9/27.9 6.7/34 5.9/37.4

Due to the continuing success of our previous pupil premium strategy, and its positive impact on the attainment and progress of the children in receipt of this fund, we will continue to utilise Pupil Premium money in the same way as previous years.

Teaching and Learning

Hambleton’s main expenditure will be on our Learning Mentor who is there to provide support and guidance to help our children who are experiencing difficulties in learning due to social, emotional or behavioural problems. Our Learning Mentor helps our children overcome behavioural, social or emotional problems that are affecting their learning. One to one support staff

Curriculum

We will continue to design our new curriculum to reflect the needs and aspirations of our school and the assessment linked to the curriculum to ensure that we are closing the gap for disadvantaged children.

Enrichment

As well as continuing to provide free membership of extra-curricular clubs, we will provide additional clubs to improve and develop language and social skills to equip children with the skills that they need to be successful in life.

PSHCE (Personal, Social, Health and Citizenship Education)

We believe that learning starts with a child’s state of mind or mental health and in order for children to reach their full potential they need to have academic resilience. Through our engagement with our Learning Mentor and Trinity Counselling Services/Intervention groups, we seek to develop understanding of resilience across the whole school community and to establish systems to build ‘resilience approaches’ that support disadvantaged children over time, through a whole school approach.

Main barriers to educational achievement

We have very few barriers to educational achievement amongst our PP children and non-PP children on the whole. The few challenges we have include;

  • Low income
  • Poor home learning environment

How we will measure impact

  • We will continue to close the gap for educational achievement, compared to non-PP peers. (Resilience questionnaire/analysis and observations).
  • We will have resilient children ready to begin the next stage of learning. (School data 2020).

How the money will be spent 2019/2020

Due to the success of our previous pupil premium strategy, and its positive impact on the attainment and progress of the children in receipt of this fund, we will continue to utilise Pupil Premium money in the same way as detailed above.

In addition the money we are due to receive this year is going to be used to train support staff in order to deliver the Trinity Hospice counselling and support programme to Pupil Premium pupils requiring this intervention.

The breakdown is as follows;

Total eligible: 28 (12.3%)

FSM – 19

AFC – 6

LAC – 2

EHCP – 1

*Service child – 2

Total funding £35,200

  • Learning Mentor Time (including target work)

3 days x 5 hours @ £10 = £150

£150 x 40 weeks = £6,000

  • Extra TA Booster time (in class)

5 days x 6 hours @£10 = £300

£300 x 40 weeks = £12,000

  • IDL (Spelling Programme)

IDL yearly Subscription: £200

TA time to run the programme-

15 mins x 5 days a week = 75 mins

75 mins x 5 classes = 375 mins (6.25 hours)

6.25 x £10 x 40 weeks = £2,500

  • Trinity Counselling and Link Service

Total: £2500

  • Proposed Speech and Language Specialist

Shine and Communicate have both been contacted and will be contacting myself with a price to come to Hambleton weekly to deliver speech language intervention and also assess children who we feel would benefit from some targeted work (£6,000)

  • TA time to deliver speech and language intervention = £3000
  • SENCo/Pupil Premium Champion time = £3,000

TOTAL = £35,200